Acne Scars: Basics

acne scars

“Acne Vulgaris” or what you know commonly as Acne is a skin condition that occurs when your hair follicles become plugged with oil and dead skin cells. It causes whiteheads, blackheads or pimples. Acne is most common among teenagers, though it affects people of all ages.

Dealing with whiteheads, blackheads and pimples can be an embarrassing, frustrating process.  Most of the time, acne comes and goes without any long-term effects. However, some forms of acne can leave behind persistent, obvious scars that can affect both your appearance and your self-confidence.

But losing confidence is not the answer. Read the article below to learn how to manage the scars, treat and prevent them.

What is ACNE?

Acne is a common skin condition. As per estimates the number of people affected by acne in India is estimated to reach 23 million at a compound annual growth rate (compound average growth rate) of 0.5 percent. Females are more prone to acne as compared to males in India. So you are not alone if you are this.

Acne vulgaris, also known as acne, is a common, chronic, inflammatory disease of the glands that produce sebum (sebaceous follicles). This disease results in the formation of inflamed elevations (papules, pustules, nodules, and cysts), comedones (blackheads and whiteheads), and scars on the skin

What Causes Acne Scars?

Acne scars are, obviously, caused by acne. However, the process behind them is a little more complicated than it may seem at first, with certain types of acne more likely to contribute to the development of scars than others.

For the most part, acne scars form the same way as other scars that can develop after injuries or other damage to your skin.

When acne occurs deep in your skin, it can damage the skin and surrounding tissue. When the acne clears, your skin begins to heal itself, producing new collagen to serve as a foundation for the new skin tissue. Your body’s process for repairing skin is incredible. However, it’s not perfect. Sometimes, your body might produce slightly too much or too little collagen, resulting in a scar that doesn’t quite match the surrounding skin.

Scarring is generally more common when your skin is injured deeply. For acne, the deeper the damage caused by the acne is within your skin, the more likely it is to leave a scar.

All types of acne develop when your skin’s hair follicles, or pores, become clogged with either sebum, dead skin cells, or a combination of these two substances. Sometimes, bacteria can become trapped inside a clogged pore. When this happens, the pore can develop into a type of infected, inflamed acne. This type of acne is usually red in color and raised from the skin.

Types of Acne Scarring

Acne scars come in a range of different forms. Some scars are depressed, or atrophic, meaning they sit below the surface of your skin. Other scars are raised, or hypertrophic, meaning they sit slightly above your surrounding skin.

  • Ice Pick Scars – Ice pick scars are deep and narrow. They resemble the type of scarring that could be left behind by a long, thin instrument like an ice pick. Scars of this type often form after deep acne breakouts on the forehead and cheeks, where the skin is relatively thin. Ice pick scars are extremely common, making up about 60 to 70 percent of all depressed acne scarring.
  • Boxcar Scars – Boxcar scars are wide and typically quite shallow. They can be round or oval in shape, with a sharp edge that sets them apart from the rest of your skin. Boxcar scars look like an open boxcar, with a relatively wide diameter and a shallow depth. Boxcar scars are less common than ice pick scars, accounting for around 20 to 30 percent of depressed acne scarring.
  • Rolling Scars– Rolling scars are generally wide and shallow, with smooth edges that create the impression of rolling and uneven skin. Rolling scars often appear to be less deep than other Acne Scar Treatment. Rolling scars typically develop on areas of the skin that are thicker, such as the jaw and lower cheeks. These type of scars are less common than ice pick and boxcar scars, making up approximately 15 to 25 percent of depressed acne scarring.
  • Hypertrophic Scars– Hypertrophic scars, or keloid scars, are scars that are caused by growth of the fibrous tissue of the skin. They develop when the skin heals after an injury, such as an acne lesion. Unlike the other types of acne scarring, hypertrophic scars are raised above the surrounding skin.

It’s normal for hypertrophic scarring to affect the chest, back, shoulders and jaw line. Scars of this type are common in people with dark skin and may itch or feel painful.

  • Other Marks Left Behind By Acne

Although they’re not a form of scarring, some acne lesions can leave behind small areas of skin that look darker than your normal skin tone.  

This is referred to as post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation. Although it technically isn’t scarring, the dark color left behind by some types of acne can last for significantly longer than the acne itself.

Prevention and Cure of Acne Scarring

If you’re prone to acne, it’s important to treat your current acne breakouts before you focus on scarring.

  • Treat acne as soon as it develops. More acne usually means more potential for scars to develop. If you’re prone to acne, make sure to treat it as soon as you notice any new acne lesions developing, as each breakout can potentially leave behind scars.
  • acne is caused by excessive oil (sebum) production, so do not apply oily products on your skin since they tend to worsen the condition
  • Don’t pop or pick at your acne. As tempting as it might be, popping acne isn’t a good idea. Not only can popping pimples make your acne worse by pushing bacteria deeper beneath your skin — it can also lead to permanent scarring.
  • Avoid picking at scabs. If you do pop a pimple and it turns into a scab, make sure not to pick at the scab. This can stop the skin from healing properly and make it more likely that a scar will develop.

For mild mild acne scars, using an over-the-counter treatment may help to make them lighter and less visible.

  • Salicylic acid- A popular ingredient in over-the-counter acne products, salicylic acid can clear pores and reduce swelling from inflamed acne. As a peeling agent, it can also help to treat mild Acne Scar Removal. However, it may not be an ideal option if you have deep or severe acne scarring.
  • Alpha hydroxy acids- Some alpha-hydroxy acids, which are used in skincare products sold over the counter, may help to treat acne scars by promoting exfoliation. These are mild acids that work by helping to strip away the outermost, oldest layer of the skin. SKYNOPTIK AHA-BHA Exfoliant is a good choice

Skynoptic Anti Scar Gel is formulated with clinically proven ingredients that help control and eliminate any scar over a period of time. The gel is infused with natural extracts. Lemon peel extract help reduce hyperpigmentation in certain scars. Simialrly, rosesheep oil extract and blackseed oil extrct help in reducing the symptoms and prvent scarring. Other ingredients – Hyalurnoic acid occurs naturally in body and fills scars. Using natural ingredients which your body already uses to make yourself look younger and more beautiful is the healthiest way to do it!

“Treat acne as soon as it develops”

Skynoptic Anti Scar Gel is formulated with clinically proven ingredients that help control and eliminate any scar over a period of time. The gel is infused with natural extracts. Lemon peel extract help reduce hyperpigmentation in certain scars. Similarly, rosesheep oil extract and blackseed oil extrct help in reducing the symptoms and prevent scarring. Other ingredients – Hyalurnoic acid occurs naturally in body and fills scars. Using natural ingredients which your body already uses to make yourself look younger and more beautiful is the healthiest way to do it!

This article is for informational purposes only. The information contained herein is not a substitute for and should never be relied upon for professional medical advice. Always talk to your doctor about the risks and benefits of any treatment.

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